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OTHER MARTIAL ARTS FROM THE INTERNAL SCHOOL

LIU HE BA FA QUAN / WATER BOXING (SHUI QUAN)

 

ORIGINS

Full name: HUA YUE XIN YI LIU HE BA FA SAN PAN SHI ER SHI QUAN.

Literal translation:

Hua Yue: Hua means China, as well as magnificent, splendid. Yue means high mountain.
Xin yi: Idea, intention, purpose.
Liu he: 6 links or combinations ("he" also means closing)
Ba fa: 8 methods
Shi er shi: 12 movements
Quan: fist (meaning boxing, fighting)


The origin of this internal style is attributed to the daoist monk Chén Bó (872-989), although some people think this is not likely because this boxing contains elements from Xing Yi Quan and Ba Gua Zhan, and these styles are more modern. And alternative explanation would be, though, that these latter styles had taken these elements out from Liu He Ba Fa. Chen Bo was a daoist monk who lived at the monastery in the holy mountains of Hua Yie, nowadays better known as Hua Shan. There he cultivated the Dao for a period of time of 40 years. He was also an erudite of the I Jing, and his art on calligraphy was remarkable. Some of his calligraphies can still be seen in the caves of Long Men.



GENEALOGY

As mentioned above, Chen Bo (871-989) might be developer of this style. There are no documents available, as far as I know, about the transmission of Liu He Ba Fa to present time. The only name related to this regard is that of Li Döng Fëng, who was told to be Chén Bo’s disciple, and wrote the following poem (free translation):

xïn yì bên wú fâ
yôu fâ shì xü wü
xü wü dêi zì rán
wú fâ bù róng shù
Mind-Intention, in principle, must lack a methodology
If there is a method, this must be just the Void, because
by the Void one can reach what is natural
However, the (full) lack of methodology is also unforgivable.

 

The art of Liu He Ba Fa was passed on to Wú Yì Huï (I do not know the period), who also studied "Lû Hóng Bä Shì" with master Sóng Qïng Wén, incorporating this boxing to Liu He Ba Fa. "Lü Hóng Bä Shì" was characterized by clash techniques, lifting, breaking, twisting, pulling, drilling, knocking down, seizing hold of joints, and a movement similar to hands like clouds.

 

CHARACTERISTICS

It is soft like taiji quan, and has the steps of ba gua and the full vigour of xing yi quan.

Huá Yuè: This regards to the fact that this art has been transmitted mainly in the surroundings of the Hua mountains (Hua Shan).

Xïn Yì: Mind/Heart-Intention. This is an important concept. The Mind-Intention must lead the movements.

Liù Hé: Six links, it means that you must tighly connect

    1. body with mind
    2. mind with intention
    3. intention with qi
    4. qi with spirit
    5. spirit with work (physical work required), and
    6. the effort you make, with the void

Bä Fâ: Eight methods.

    1. It regards to make qi flow, concentrate the spirit
    2. the energy from bones must be collected inside
    3. imitate the forms from animals
    4. roundness as the tactics to respond
    5. stand vertically from the crown to feel light
    6. go repeatedly back and forth
    7. in the stops one must keep the void
    8. hide the intention until the moment is found

Sän Pán: Three circles at different heights.

In the high one, to be as fast as wind

In the medium one, to be like a swimming dragon

In the low circle, brushing the ground shows your gong-fu

Shí èr shì: Twelve movements (Note: we do not include the English translation of these, because the translation from Chinese into Spanish was already tentative, and we did not think that a following translation from Spanish into English would be very trustworthy.

    1. Dragón que guerrea (empujar y rozar)
    2. Tigre que se abalanza (arroje que dista)
    3. Grulla que se alinea (engullir atrayendo)
    4. Leopardo/pantera que da zarpazos (partir en cuña y agarrar)
    5. Mono que marea (fustigar y embestir)
    6. Oso que hace placaje (reventar y apartar)
    7. Oca que ladea (girar y revolver)
    8. Serpiente que rastrea (estirar y contraer)
    9. Aguila que palmea (extraer y pegar)
    10. Pato que se aleja veloz (enredar molestando)
    11. Rocho -ave fabulosa de mucha fuerza- que ataca (sacudida de costado)
    12. Lín -otro animal mítico chino- que se enrosca (enganchar y cerrar)

(Translation to english: Enric Saiz)

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